Brand : Frank John Hughes

Mr. Vincent



Michael hauge |

From love to obsession

Mr. vincent is a terrific movie - a powerful, disturbing and ultimately enlightening film exploring a man's journey from infatuation to love to obsession. the direction by robert celestino, the wonderfully atmospheric black & white cinematography, and the performances -- including an oscar-worthy portrayal by frank john hughes -- are superior to most movies costing a hundred times what this one did.

Born into this |

Yearning in yonkers; or, a descent into the male-strom

As convincing and riveting a portrait of male eros-psychology as you're likely to see. among other things it makes me wonder if a man's desire for recognition in the world is inextricably bound up with the erotic-romantic. although i liked the opening feel i almost 'wrote it off' early on because of what played like a cliched beginning. but it soon became evident that i was in very competent directorial hands: strong material with acute attention to psychological detail; the actors lived it rather than performed it. and the black & white picture actually became a character in the film: it came out brilliantly. there are flaws here--all the threads are not brought together satisfactorily (of course in real life they never are either but...)and i have problems with the ending but what it does well it does powerfully well.

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Searing indelible power

John vincent teaches english at his old high school in yonkers, sings and play guitar in empty pubs at night. he's not half bad, but he's not best seller material either: he's a touch too earnest, too much tied to his tiny little world. when his wife leaves him, his loneliness is quickly assuaged by lisa, a local waitress and past acquaintance. thier romance is passionate, but it moves too quickly for wary lisa and soon john seems less a devoted partner and more a jealous, potentially psychotic stalker. director robert celestino scars the screen with pure black and white, illuminating the dark side of john's nature. his images are filled with real people, with real feelings; his characters work slave jobs, get their periods, break down at work. under his careful direction, like that of a mordern day cassavetes, loniness and alienation seem less the cultural currency of the moment and more the unwavering paradigm of human relationships. mr. vincent is a "love story" of searing, indelible power.